Readings & Events

36th Annual Reading Series
 
Mei-mei Berssenbrugge & Richard Tuttle Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 6:00pm
Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Dr.
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in partnership with the Writing Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Visiting Artists Program

Poet Mei-mei Berssenbrugge and visual artist Richard Tuttle present a joint reading of their work. They have worked together on numerous occasions through the exploration of poetic medium, including the collaborative works Sphericity and Hiddenness.

Mei-Mei BerssenbruggeMei-mei Berssenbrugge is the author of numerous volumes of poetry, most recently I Love Artists: New and Selected Poems (University of California Press, 2006) and Concordance (Kelsey St. Press, 2006), a collaboration with the sculptor Kiki Smith. Her other collections include Nest (2003); The Four Year Old Girl (1998); Endocrinology (1997), a collaboration with Kiki Smith; Sphericity (1993); Empathy (1989); and The Heat Bird (1983). Berssenbrugge is the recipient of two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, two American Book Awards, and honors from the Asian American Writers Workshop and the Western States Art Foundation. She has been a contributing editor of Conjunctions Magazine since 1978 and has taught at Brown University.

tuttleRichard Tuttle creates minimalist geometric paintings that explore the possibilities of lines. Tuttle studied at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and after moving to New York in 1963 he spent a semester at the Cooper Union and worked at the Betty Parsons Gallery. In 2005, Tuttle had a major retrospective spanning his 40 year career at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. He lives and works in New York City and New Mexico. He has been the recipient of many awards for his work including the 74th American Exhibition, Art Institute of Chicago Biennial Prize, the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture, New York, and the Aachen Art Prize, Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst, Germany.

 
Working backward in sleep, the
last thing you numbed to is what
wakes you.

What if that image were Eros as
words?

What would it be like if you
contemplated my words and I felt
you?

Animals, an owl, frog, open their
eyes, and a mirror forms on the
ground.

When insight comes in a dream,
and events the next day
illuminate it, this begins your
streaming consciousness,
synchronicity, asymptotic lines
of the flights of concordances.

An owl opens its eyes in deep
woods.

For the first time, I write and you
don't know me.

Milkweed I touch floats.

                                  Mei-mei Berrsenbrugge
                                  from Concordance